The Tale of Shamhat [In Uruk with Gilgamish]
The Tale of Shamhat [In Uruk with Gilgamish]

“I firmly believe, had there not been a Shamhat, in the vaults of Uruk’s antiquity: there never would have been an, ‘Epic of Gilgamesh.'”

A Tale of Shamhat

[In Uruk with Gilgamish]

1) Uruk and Gilgamesh

Gilgamish–the King of Uruk

(The judge, lustful ruler, builder)

A warrior-god in the land of Sumer

(4th-king after Lugulbanda)

With the war-cry, he’d bellow–

In a godlike frame, so the poet’s sang.

In his quiet-palace home, by the heath

He wooed and moved the lovely Shamhat:

(Ninsum’s: mother’s priestess)

But he would not take her for his bride

In the Temple of Innia–he insulted,

The temple goddess and his mothers pride.

A trifle delightful was she, sad thing

For she belonged to the warrior emperor:

Gilgamish, the king of kings;

Thus, she moved among the temple court

(The Ziggurat, Mesopotamia)

A brilliant star, on a string in the cosmos.

The spacious, Grand Palace House of Uruk

That nested in the Market Square

The wise demigod Ninsum was often there

Where Shamhat’s beauty caught her glow

A love priestess for her Temple.

Orgies with boys, soldier’s wives, virgins

Gilgamesh needed not, nor gave no rest

But bore his nakedness from foot to chest–

Taking all woman betrothed for his quest

To fill his void, his boredom, Uruk cried….

2) Shamhat and Enkidu

Enkidu–within the Cedar Forest

(Northern Forest–Syria)

The prince of the wild men, forbidden

With a bears eye, and a dears heart

(The Cedar Forest thick)

So Shamhat was sent to woo him.

She came from Uruk’s harlot temple

She slept within the forest thick

(to trick, the savage beast Enkidu)

In nakedness, she wept and wooed

As he ate with forest beasts

As he watched her by a shallow creek.

Shamhat and he knew one from one

That there would be encompassed fun:

The most beautiful, with the man-beast

Both wanting to reach, teach–moan

Within the forest thick alone.

Hidden within the deep-foliage forest

Were the boy and his father–waiting;

Who had first brought word of this feat!

To be–and seen the wild man asleep?

Thus, to capture this wild man–for Uruk

So Gilgamesh would have his equal.

Said he, “O Shamhat, why are you here?”

“For the king of Uruk, bid’s you cheer!”

And so they slept together many days–

And she groomed him in many ways.

“O lovely Shamhat, with child due,

In the Cedar Forest I love but you.”

Said she: “Come back with me to Uruk!

Where there will be but one equal?”

The Underworld

Gilgamesh prayed to the underworld–

Invoking incantations and ritual–;

As he had his people pray to him:

‘Gilgamesh, the Supreme King,

Judge of the Anunnaki,’ Kur-underworld.

The Great King built, for the goddess Ninlil

A Shrine by the King of Kish, by Nippur–

(Who helped restore the city, after war?)

The battle with Kish would start and end–

Yet, with Gilgamesh, they’d remain friends.

Epilogue

Uruk

Unto Uruk, whom with guarded towers

Whose full spirits–and broken tears

Up unto the death of Gilgamish–

(Matchless in skill, spear and shield)

Never did stop the fires of glory

But on twelve-tablets wrote this story.

Gilgamesh

The great Mesopotamia hunter

The great builder of cities: Uruk;

He was the king of kings of Sumer

Who with: Enkidu, fought the bull

The wild bull of heaven–Istar’s:

Defeated the bull and offended her.

Shamhat

Hence, Shamhat’s glory–untold tell now

In particular, within Uruk’s great walls

(whom carried the child of Enkidu)

Whom was, to Gilgamesh–faithful

The Queen of this long lost tale, died

As the towering Temple, buried her alive.

Enkidu

And let us not rest–with Gilgamish

For Enkidu gave his life for his king–

(So he could be all things)

Only to come back in as crying ghost,

In horror and grief, from Kur

To tell his story: hell has no glory–

As Gilgamish wept and listened.

Afterward

The Untold Story of Shamhat, whom was the adolescent-young woman, the counselor, priestess of the Temple of Love in Uruk [2700 BC]; the confident of the goddess Ninsum, mother to Gilgamish; the Harlot that subdued Enkidu the wild man of the Cedar Forest, and brought him back to Gilgamesh; the one that caused Gilgamesh and Enkidu to hunt and kill the demigod beast who guarded the forest and mountain, called Humbaba; and who gave birth to a son belonging to the wild-man Enkidu. And by whose hands–unknown hands, does she die by? A question seldom asked, or even looked at. Is it an accident of nature? It is a question for all to ponder over which has not been looked at before; there is a clue in the poem, the story of Shamhat but it will be left up to you, the reader to decide where the truth and fiction rests.

This side of the poetic-story has never been told quite like this, and most likely will never be told again in the same likeness. In this tale, the real hero is Shamhat, not Gilgamesh, and long overdue, if you ask me: like 6000-years overdue. The story has been handed down by word of mouth, and then written down in stanzas on twelve-tablets (cuneiform); each generation adding to his glorious life–I’m sure. And there have been other records of these three heroes of yesterday in the vaults of the world, Shamhat, Gilgamish and Enkidu. But I do believe, had there not been a Shamhat, there would not have been a recorded Gilgamesh.

In antiquities reality, Gilgamesh was bisexual, which was not uncommon; just not spoken of for the most part in our contemporary atmosphere. Nor has he been directly called a demigod, but the truth was he was just that, in the flesh. And so in the Epic Poem I have created for Shamhat, many new things are revealed, as is her death; could it have been the spirit-ghost of Humbaba the Forest guardian–and a monster demon’s demise? The killing of the Bull from Heaven, brought down by the powers of the Goddess Innina was said to have brought about Enkidu’s death also.

Only the basics have been told to the public, but when one researches between the lines many other things come to light.

Gilgamesh had a son not talked about in previous books. The battle with the city-state of Kish of which he won; the meeting of Noah prior to the flood (some say after the flood), for Gilgamesh’s long and hard sought after immortality, haunted him, most all the time up to his last few years of life (he lived 175-years).

Gilgamesh was 2/3’s spirit and 1/3 human; did not sleep, and could stay awake all night having sex orgies with boys, virgins, and his soldiers wives without rest, and that in itself was a good reason for the boy and his father to be cohorts with the city of Uruk, into bringing the news of an equal to Gilgamesh in the thick of the forest, an equal to keep him busy; and at the end of the great king’s life, he dies in peace within his bed, like you and I, with a wife, child, and the finding of a one-god to worship, as it was in the beginning, it was for him. All this comes to light in the poem.

Commentary on Shamhat

Notes and a small commentary on Shamhat [otherwise known as Harim, servant of the Goddess; the goddess whom is known as Ishtar or Innia:

[It is a love story, a story of seeking and finding, a drama, and horror story if you will, but most of all it is a story of a woman who produced a legacy that would last 5000-years.] Shamhat celebrates life as it comes; something Enkidu never accomplishes, especially after being given the new role of sidekick to the king of kings, –Gilgamesh, who only celebrates life at its end; or there about–if you read between the lines of the Epic Poem of Gilgamesh, and even if you had the poetic epic in front of you now, you would see a man who had it all like King Solomon, and didn’t know where to turn in life with it; and a woman who seeks out life [Shamhat], and takes it all; Shamhat who lives within this ancient hero’s legacy his shadow you could say. Shamhat lived and died happy I do believe, and for her time, lived life to its fullest.

About the Epic

The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of the worlds truly first great works in literature, surpassing the Iliad, Odyssey, Aroid, The Voyage of Argo, and King Arthur, in age, and possibly in beauty. Posterity has kept its dynamics and intrigue I feel, leaving the reader in awe of the world before and after the Great Flood; with its interesting kings of which there is little know of them. It was originally composed by a Babylonian poet in Akkadian, but the legend goes back farther, to Sumerian times [pre-Babylonian], and possible pre Sumerian.

The stones this epic-poem was written on were damaged, in pieces, fragments, and so there are parts missing, this is where I come in I have filled some of the openings with what I believe to be Shamhat, with a few hidden things on the other two smaller heroes. I do not care to do the legend damage, and so I have as I mentioned reviewed many translations, along with historical data on the area and subject, to include historical maps. Compared to the world now, it was quite small to the composer of the Gilgamesh Epic, or its legend. And again we must go back farther than that to see the city he governed and ruled, and those who ruled before him.

The invention of writing, so it has been said, started around 3000 BC, I feel that is far from the truth, yet I care not again, to debate this out here and now, the epic was handed down by orators, much like Homer did, a memorized poem and passed on by word of mouth, although there has been data on Gilgamesh in other forms, in such ancient libraries in Syria, and in the cities of ancient Sumer itself [Iraq]; and other bits and pieces of his family background, etc. Gilgamesh ruled for the most part Uruk for 126-years. He lived to be around 175-years old, as I have previously mentioned.

Other than being a moody king and as powerful as you would expect a demigod to be, he was highly sexual if not down right honey; and as mentioned before, lightly, he was not biased on who he took to bed, the wives of others, virgins, children, boys. He put into effect within his kingdom the rule of being able to take to bed any woman whom would announce wedding plans, and, consequently would have to get his permission for marriage. Yes, he took these rules way beyond its norm, but then that was Gilgamish.

“I firmly believe, had there not been a Shamhat, in the vaults of Uruk’s antiquity: there never would have been an, ‘Epic of Gilgamesh.'”

A Tale of Shamhat

[In Uruk with Gilgamish]

1) Uruk and Gilgamesh

Gilgamish–the King of Uruk

(The judge, lustful ruler, builder)

A warrior-god in the land of Sumer

(4th-king after Lugulbanda)

With the war-cry, he’d bellow–

In a godlike frame, so the poet’s sang.

In his quiet-palace home, by the heath

He wooed and moved the lovely Shamhat:

(Ninsum’s: mother’s priestess)

But he would not take her for his bride

In the Temple of Innia–he insulted,

The temple goddess and his mothers pride.

A trifle delightful was she, sad thing

For she belonged to the warrior emperor:

Gilgamish, the king of kings;

Thus, she moved among the temple court

(The Ziggurat, Mesopotamia)

A brilliant star, on a string in the cosmos.

The spacious, Grand Palace House of Uruk

That nested in the Market Square

The wise demigod Ninsum was often there

Where Shamhat’s beauty caught her glow

A love priestess for her Temple.

Orgies with boys, soldier’s wives, virgins

Gilgamesh needed not, nor gave no rest

But bore his nakedness from foot to chest–

Taking all woman betrothed for his quest

To fill his void, his boredom, Uruk cried….

2) Shamhat and Enkidu

Enkidu–within the Cedar Forest

(Northern Forest–Syria)

The prince of the wild men, forbidden

With a bears eye, and a dears heart

(The Cedar Forest thick)

So Shamhat was sent to woo him.

She came from Uruk’s harlot temple

She slept within the forest thick

(to trick, the savage beast Enkidu)

In nakedness, she wept and wooed

As he ate with forest beasts

As he watched her by a shallow creek.

Shamhat and he knew one from one

That there would be encompassed fun:

The most beautiful, with the man-beast

Both wanting to reach, teach–moan

Within the forest thick alone.

Hidden within the deep-foliage forest

Were the boy and his father–waiting;

Who had first brought word of this feat!

To be–and seen the wild man asleep?

Thus, to capture this wild man–for Uruk

So Gilgamesh would have his equal.

Said he, “O Shamhat, why are you here?”

“For the king of Uruk, bid’s you cheer!”

And so they slept together many days–

And she groomed him in many ways.

“O lovely Shamhat, with child due,

In the Cedar Forest I love but you.”

Said she: “Come back with me to Uruk!

Where there will be but one equal?”

The Underworld

Gilgamesh prayed to the underworld–

Invoking incantations and ritual–;

As he had his people pray to him:

‘Gilgamesh, the Supreme King,

Judge of the Anunnaki,’ Kur-underworld.

The Great King built, for the goddess Ninlil

A Shrine by the King of Kish, by Nippur–

(Who helped restore the city, after war?)

The battle with Kish would start and end–

Yet, with Gilgamesh, they’d remain friends.

Epilogue

Uruk

Unto Uruk, whom with guarded towers

Whose full spirits–and broken tears

Up unto the death of Gilgamish–

(Matchless in skill, spear and shield)

Never did stop the fires of glory

But on twelve-tablets wrote this story.

Gilgamesh

The great Mesopotamia hunter

The great builder of cities: Uruk;

He was the king of kings of Sumer

Who with: Enkidu, fought the bull

The wild bull of heaven–Istar’s:

Defeated the bull and offended her.

Shamhat

Hence, Shamhat’s glory–untold tell now

In particular, within Uruk’s great walls

(whom carried the child of Enkidu)

Whom was, to Gilgamesh–faithful

The Queen of this long lost tale, died

As the towering Temple, buried her alive.

Enkidu

And let us not rest–with Gilgamish

For Enkidu gave his life for his king–

(So he could be all things)

Only to come back in as crying ghost,

In horror and grief, from Kur

To tell his story: hell has no glory–

As Gilgamish wept and listened.

Afterward

The Untold Story of Shamhat, whom was the adolescent-young woman, the counselor, priestess of the Temple of Love in Uruk [2700 BC]; the confident of the goddess Ninsum, mother to Gilgamish; the Harlot that subdued Enkidu the wild man of the Cedar Forest, and brought him back to Gilgamesh; the one that caused Gilgamesh and Enkidu to hunt and kill the demigod beast who guarded the forest and mountain, called Humbaba; and who gave birth to a son belonging to the wild-man Enkidu. And by whose hands–unknown hands, does she die by? A question seldom asked, or even looked at. Is it an accident of nature? It is a question for all to ponder over which has not been looked at before; there is a clue in the poem, the story of Shamhat but it will be left up to you, the reader to decide where the truth and fiction rests.

This side of the poetic-story has never been told quite like this, and most likely will never be told again in the same likeness. In this tale, the real hero is Shamhat, not Gilgamesh, and long overdue, if you ask me: like 6000-years overdue. The story has been handed down by word of mouth, and then written down in stanzas on twelve-tablets (cuneiform); each generation adding to his glorious life–I’m sure. And there have been other records of these three heroes of yesterday in the vaults of the world, Shamhat, Gilgamish and Enkidu. But I do believe, had there not been a Shamhat, there would not have been a recorded Gilgamesh.

In antiquities reality, Gilgamesh was bisexual, which was not uncommon; just not spoken of for the most part in our contemporary atmosphere. Nor has he been directly called a demigod, but the truth was he was just that, in the flesh. And so in the Epic Poem I have created for Shamhat, many new things are revealed, as is her death; could it have been the spirit-ghost of Humbaba the Forest guardian–and a monster demon’s demise? The killing of the Bull from Heaven, brought down by the powers of the Goddess Innina was said to have brought about Enkidu’s death also.

Only the basics have been told to the public, but when one researches between the lines many other things come to light.

Gilgamesh had a son not talked about in previous books. The battle with the city-state of Kish of which he won; the meeting of Noah prior to the flood (some say after the flood), for Gilgamesh’s long and hard sought after immortality, haunted him, most all the time up to his last few years of life (he lived 175-years).

Gilgamesh was 2/3’s spirit and 1/3 human; did not sleep, and could stay awake all night having sex orgies with boys, virgins, and his soldiers wives without rest, and that in itself was a good reason for the boy and his father to be cohorts with the city of Uruk, into bringing the news of an equal to Gilgamesh in the thick of the forest, an equal to keep him busy; and at the end of the great king’s life, he dies in peace within his bed, like you and I, with a wife, child, and the finding of a one-god to worship, as it was in the beginning, it was for him. All this comes to light in the poem.

Commentary on Shamhat

Notes and a small commentary on Shamhat [otherwise known as Harim, servant of the Goddess; the goddess whom is known as Ishtar or Innia:

[It is a love story, a story of seeking and finding, a drama, and horror story if you will, but most of all it is a story of a woman who produced a legacy that would last 5000-years.] Shamhat celebrates life as it comes; something Enkidu never accomplishes, especially after being given the new role of sidekick to the king of kings, –Gilgamesh, who only celebrates life at its end; or there about–if you read between the lines of the Epic Poem of Gilgamesh, and even if you had the poetic epic in front of you now, you would see a man who had it all like King Solomon, and didn’t know where to turn in life with it; and a woman who seeks out life [Shamhat], and takes it all; Shamhat who lives within this ancient hero’s legacy his shadow you could say. Shamhat lived and died happy I do believe, and for her time, lived life to its fullest.

About the Epic

The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of the worlds truly first great works in literature, surpassing the Iliad, Odyssey, Aroid, The Voyage of Argo, and King Arthur, in age, and possibly in beauty. Posterity has kept its dynamics and intrigue I feel, leaving the reader in awe of the world before and after the Great Flood; with its interesting kings of which there is little know of them. It was originally composed by a Babylonian poet in Akkadian, but the legend goes back farther, to Sumerian times [pre-Babylonian], and possible pre Sumerian.

The stones this epic-poem was written on were damaged, in pieces, fragments, and so there are parts missing, this is where I come in I have filled some of the openings with what I believe to be Shamhat, with a few hidden things on the other two smaller heroes. I do not care to do the legend damage, and so I have as I mentioned reviewed many translations, along with historical data on the area and subject, to include historical maps. Compared to the world now, it was quite small to the composer of the Gilgamesh Epic, or its legend. And again we must go back farther than that to see the city he governed and ruled, and those who ruled before him.

The invention of writing, so it has been said, started around 3000 BC, I feel that is far from the truth, yet I care not again, to debate this out here and now, the epic was handed down by orators, much like Homer did, a memorized poem and passed on by word of mouth, although there has been data on Gilgamesh in other forms, in such ancient libraries in Syria, and in the cities of ancient Sumer itself [Iraq]; and other bits and pieces of his family background, etc. Gilgamesh ruled for the most part Uruk for 126-years. He lived to be around 175-years old, as I have previously mentioned.

Other than being a moody king and as powerful as you would expect a demigod to be, he was highly sexual if not down right honey; and as mentioned before, lightly, he was not biased on who he took to bed, the wives of others, virgins, children, boys. He put into effect within his kingdom the rule of being able to take to bed any woman whom would announce wedding plans, and, consequently would have to get his permission for marriage. Yes, he took these rules way beyond its norm, but then that was Gilgamish.

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