Butterfly Koi – A Beauty Or A Beast?
Butterfly Koi – A Beauty Or A Beast?

Nishikigoi have many different standards that determine their popularity and their value. While the butterfly carp is beautiful in its own way it is not popular among all breeders and keepers. The typical standards of color, size, coloration and scalation are not the same with the Butterfly Koi. The availability of the colorful Koi are very popular. You will not find that variety in the production and exhibition of the Butterfly Koi. you will also find that they are not as valuable as many of the other varieties. If you are a hobbyist, you will probably want to include a few in your pond in order to enjoy the beauty of these magnificent fish.

Longfin Koi, Dragon Carp, Butterfly Koi are all the same fish. They are an ornamental fish that gets their name from the longer fins. As with other Koi, they are a type of common carp. They first made their appearance in the mid 1990’s. The breed is a result of the attempt to increase hardiness of the traditional Koi. They resulted from interbreeding traditional types of Koi with the Longfin river carp from Indonesia. The result was a fish that had the longer fins, pompom nostrils, longer barbells and were hardier than the traditional Koi. In Japan they became known as “onagaoi” or “hire naga Koi.” This translated to long tail Koi. The name Butterfly Koi is the result of a noted Koi breeder stating that the fish looked like a butterfly.

These fish are not popular in Japan or Europe. They are very popular in the United States where they are readily available.

Judging the Butterfly Koi is different from other Koi. They are not suitable for traditional Koi competition. There are several reasons for this.

An ideal Koi is oval and large. The Butterfly fish is thinner. It does not meet the criteria for the larger, more traditional Koi. When judging traditional Koi, there is a lot of emphasis placed on the ratio of the fins to the body. The standards that are set for nishikigoi competition is exceeded by a great percentages. It can be up to 1000 percent longer than is acceptable. This gives the Butterfly Koi an appearance of slenderness as opposed to the chunky appearance of the other Koi in the competitions.

Although there has been great energy towards developing the perfect Butterfly fish with traditional Koi patterns, it has not yet happened. The Butterfly Koi has patterns that are different from the Kohaku, Sanke, Showa, Utsuri and Ogon Koi.

Feelings about the Butterfly Koi range from enthusiasm by Koi fish enthusiasts in the United States to the dislike of keepers of traditional Koi in other parts of the world. The most famous and prestigious Koi keepers in Japan will not consider raising Butterfly Koi. They are considered inferior to the standard. Keepers in the United States are keen on collecting them and can readily finding them at breeders in the country or in larger fish pet shops. Hobbyists with backyard Koi ponds are the people who will usually incorporate them into their population.

Nishikigoi have many different standards that determine their popularity and their value. While the butterfly carp is beautiful in its own way it is not popular among all breeders and keepers. The typical standards of color, size, coloration and scalation are not the same with the Butterfly Koi. The availability of the colorful Koi are very popular. You will not find that variety in the production and exhibition of the Butterfly Koi. you will also find that they are not as valuable as many of the other varieties. If you are a hobbyist, you will probably want to include a few in your pond in order to enjoy the beauty of these magnificent fish.

Longfin Koi, Dragon Carp, Butterfly Koi are all the same fish. They are an ornamental fish that gets their name from the longer fins. As with other Koi, they are a type of common carp. They first made their appearance in the mid 1990’s. The breed is a result of the attempt to increase hardiness of the traditional Koi. They resulted from interbreeding traditional types of Koi with the Longfin river carp from Indonesia. The result was a fish that had the longer fins, pompom nostrils, longer barbells and were hardier than the traditional Koi. In Japan they became known as “onagaoi” or “hire naga Koi.” This translated to long tail Koi. The name Butterfly Koi is the result of a noted Koi breeder stating that the fish looked like a butterfly.

These fish are not popular in Japan or Europe. They are very popular in the United States where they are readily available.

Judging the Butterfly Koi is different from other Koi. They are not suitable for traditional Koi competition. There are several reasons for this.

An ideal Koi is oval and large. The Butterfly fish is thinner. It does not meet the criteria for the larger, more traditional Koi. When judging traditional Koi, there is a lot of emphasis placed on the ratio of the fins to the body. The standards that are set for nishikigoi competition is exceeded by a great percentages. It can be up to 1000 percent longer than is acceptable. This gives the Butterfly Koi an appearance of slenderness as opposed to the chunky appearance of the other Koi in the competitions.

Although there has been great energy towards developing the perfect Butterfly fish with traditional Koi patterns, it has not yet happened. The Butterfly Koi has patterns that are different from the Kohaku, Sanke, Showa, Utsuri and Ogon Koi.

Feelings about the Butterfly Koi range from enthusiasm by Koi fish enthusiasts in the United States to the dislike of keepers of traditional Koi in other parts of the world. The most famous and prestigious Koi keepers in Japan will not consider raising Butterfly Koi. They are considered inferior to the standard. Keepers in the United States are keen on collecting them and can readily finding them at breeders in the country or in larger fish pet shops. Hobbyists with backyard Koi ponds are the people who will usually incorporate them into their population.

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