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Typhoid In Kenya Is Subject Of Gripping New Fiction By Young Denver Author

Typhoid In Kenya Is Subject Of Gripping New Fiction By Young Denver Author
Typhoid In Kenya Is Subject Of Gripping New Fiction By Young Denver Author

Elizabeth Rose is a self-described twenty-something college student in Denver who has a double major in Religious Studies and English. She believes in giving something back to society.

“Every Tuesday night for two hours I go to a women’s facility in Lakewood and tutor formerly incarcerated women who are being slowly phased back into society” she says, getting them ready for their GED certificates as well as preparing them for re-entry into the work force.

A gifted writer, Elizabeth Rose has been publishing poetry since her junior year. Now, Amazon’s Kindle program has just released her stunning eBook, “Wanakufa (Dying).”

“Wanakufa” is the Swahili word for dying and this story is about how death — from a disease so rare in the United States that few cases are ever reported — spares no one in Africa, not even the good and the young.

In the impoverished village of Kakamega, Kenya, seven missionaries from Colorado arrive to dig wells, pray, and share the culture of the indigenous Luhya tribe. Along for the ride is Julia, a pretty and vivacious senior in high school who seems a lot like Elizabeth Rose. Julia hopes to leave her own mark on the world through her service to her church.

Having spent nearly five years in Kenya myself, I can tell you that Kakamega is a town in western Kenya near the Uganda border, right on the equator. It is about 30 miles from Kisumu, Kenya’s biggest port on Lake Victoria, the gigantic body of fresh water that is shared by Kenya and Uganda. I can also tell you that contracting typhoid in Kenya is not hard at all, quite easy in fact if you are an adventurous eater and like to visit out-of-the-way rural areas like Kakamega. Contaminated food or water is almost always the culprit. Though a vaccine exists for typhoid, many fail to get this needed protection.

Elizabeth Rose has written a riveting, if stomach tightening, account of a young American missionary’s encounter with third-world health problems. Mirrored on her personal experiences in East Africa, the fictional heroine, Julia, is exactly the sort of outgoing, pretty, talented, and very giving high school senior who would choose to make a personal effort to improve the lives of her fellow Roman Catholics living in near-squalor. Though Julia expected (and finds!) all manner of inconvenience and hardship, she did not expect to encounter death.

Whether Rose has taken a ride on this scary roller coaster herself, or whether she has merely done very excellent research, is immaterial. Her narrative grabs you in the first few paragraphs and won’t let you go until the very end. I can attest to the authenticity of her evocation of Kenya. Her vision of East Africa, told in clear, tight sentences, rang true to me.

Elizabeth Rose has already published her first novel, “Till the Last Petal Falls,” which appeared in February 2013 through Mockingbird Lane Press. That was a skillful retelling of Beauty and the Beast as a vehicle to explore abusive relationships — why women get into them, why they stay in them.

Rose is a promising young writer off to a fabulous early start. Let’s hope we hear more from her very soon.

Elizabeth Rose is a self-described twenty-something college student in Denver who has a double major in Religious Studies and English. She believes in giving something back to society.

“Every Tuesday night for two hours I go to a women’s facility in Lakewood and tutor formerly incarcerated women who are being slowly phased back into society” she says, getting them ready for their GED certificates as well as preparing them for re-entry into the work force.

A gifted writer, Elizabeth Rose has been publishing poetry since her junior year. Now, Amazon’s Kindle program has just released her stunning eBook, “Wanakufa (Dying).”

“Wanakufa” is the Swahili word for dying and this story is about how death — from a disease so rare in the United States that few cases are ever reported — spares no one in Africa, not even the good and the young.

In the impoverished village of Kakamega, Kenya, seven missionaries from Colorado arrive to dig wells, pray, and share the culture of the indigenous Luhya tribe. Along for the ride is Julia, a pretty and vivacious senior in high school who seems a lot like Elizabeth Rose. Julia hopes to leave her own mark on the world through her service to her church.

Having spent nearly five years in Kenya myself, I can tell you that Kakamega is a town in western Kenya near the Uganda border, right on the equator. It is about 30 miles from Kisumu, Kenya’s biggest port on Lake Victoria, the gigantic body of fresh water that is shared by Kenya and Uganda. I can also tell you that contracting typhoid in Kenya is not hard at all, quite easy in fact if you are an adventurous eater and like to visit out-of-the-way rural areas like Kakamega. Contaminated food or water is almost always the culprit. Though a vaccine exists for typhoid, many fail to get this needed protection.

Elizabeth Rose has written a riveting, if stomach tightening, account of a young American missionary’s encounter with third-world health problems. Mirrored on her personal experiences in East Africa, the fictional heroine, Julia, is exactly the sort of outgoing, pretty, talented, and very giving high school senior who would choose to make a personal effort to improve the lives of her fellow Roman Catholics living in near-squalor. Though Julia expected (and finds!) all manner of inconvenience and hardship, she did not expect to encounter death.

Whether Rose has taken a ride on this scary roller coaster herself, or whether she has merely done very excellent research, is immaterial. Her narrative grabs you in the first few paragraphs and won’t let you go until the very end. I can attest to the authenticity of her evocation of Kenya. Her vision of East Africa, told in clear, tight sentences, rang true to me.

Elizabeth Rose has already published her first novel, “Till the Last Petal Falls,” which appeared in February 2013 through Mockingbird Lane Press. That was a skillful retelling of Beauty and the Beast as a vehicle to explore abusive relationships — why women get into them, why they stay in them.

Rose is a promising young writer off to a fabulous early start. Let’s hope we hear more from her very soon.

http://ezinearticles.com/expert/Frank_T_Kryza/1649113

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